Neuropsychology Assessments


For information about what to expect at assessment appointments, visit our Assessment Appointment page.


What is a Neuropsychological Evaluation?     A neuropsychological evaluation is a comprehensive assessment of an individual’s neurocognitive (or brain-based) skills and how these skills are applied in their daily environments such as school, home, community, and/or the workforce.  The neuropsychological evaluation consists of clinical interviews with the client and parent/legal guardian interview (when relevant), direct testing, and rating scales.  Depending on the client's age and history, areas that may be evaluated within a neuropsychological evaluation include:
  • Cognitive functioning (often referred to as IQ testing) 
  • Attention and concentration 
  • Executive functioning 
  • Memory and learning style 
  • Language processing 
  • Visual-motor processing 
  • Social functioning 
  • Adaptive functioning (activities of daily living) 
  • Emotional adjustment 
  • Behavioral functioning


What are the benefits of a Neuropsychological Evaluation?     The benefits of a neuropsychological evaluation include:
  • A comprehensive understanding of the client’s current areas of strength and difficulty.  For those who have been evaluated in the past or may be evaluated again in the future, this can also help to track progress across time periods. 
  • Diagnostic impressions, which can efficiently communicate key information to the client’s educators, physicians, and treatment providers. 
  • A summary of the client’s learning style and educational needs. 
  • Recommendations tailored to the client’s needs, which can be applied in the home, school, work, and community environments. 
  • Continued follow-up consultation with Dr. Artnak after the completion of the evaluation.  Adult clients or the child client's parents/legal guardians are encouraged to contact Dr. Melissa Artnak with questions or follow-up after the evaluation is completed and/or the report is received.  The adult client or the child client’s parent/legal guardian may also wish to provide written consent at the appointment for Dr. Artnak to communicate specific information directly to the client’s educators, physicians, and treatment providers.


Why is a child/adolescent referred for a Neuropsychological Evaluation    Often, a child or adolescent is referred for an evaluation by a professional involved in his/her care, such as a teacher, therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, or physician, in order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of their areas of strength and difficulty.  Children/adolescents who are referred to participate in a neuropsychological evaluation may have a history of any of the following: 
  • Learning difficulties 
  • Attention problems or difficulties with executive functioning 
  • Developmental delays 
  • Difficulties with social functioning 
  • Emotional or behavioral problems 
  • Concussion or brain injury 
  • History of complications at birth or during the prenatal period 
  • Exposure to trauma 
  • A medical diagnosis or treatment that has known effects on the brain 
  • A diagnosis of a genetic disorder that affects the brain 


Why is a young adult referred for a Neuropsychological Evaluation?     A young adult may seek out an evaluation for a variety of reasons, with the goal of better understanding personal areas of strength and difficulty in the context of daily life and responsibilities.  Sometimes an they may be referred for an evaluation by a professional involved in his/her care, such as a therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, or physician.  Young adults who are referred to participate in a neuropsychological evaluation may have a history of any of the following: 
  • Educational or vocational transitions, such as starting college 
  • Learning difficulties that persist or worsen in adulthood 
  • Attention problems or difficulties with executive functioning 
  • Memory problems 
  • Difficulties with social functioning 
  • Persistent or new onset of emotional problems 
  • Concussion or brain injury 
  • History of a major medical event, such as a stroke 
  • A medical diagnosis or treatment that has known effects on the brain